HOPE MEMORIAL BRIDGE

sunny walk with a view

 

D I Z Z Y

 

May 2014

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What do you get when you add Bob Hope’s dad, 4 massive Berea sandstone statues with chiseled features reminiscent of Paul Newman, and a nearly-mile-long steel-and-concrete expanse over the Cuyahoga River?

The Hope Memorial Bridge.

Completed in 1932, the art deco truss bridge connects Carnegie Ave on the east with Lorain Ave on the west side of Cleveland and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The major architectural feature is the 4 stone pylons—the Guardians of Traffic—designed by architect Frank Walker and sculptor Henry Hering, which symbolize progress in transportation. The Lorain-Carnegie bridge was renovated and reopened in 1983, at which time it was renamed the Hope Memorial Bridge in honor of William Henry Hope, a local stonemason who worked on the Guardians in the 1930s.

In the 1970s, Cuyahoga County Engineer Albert Porter attempted to have the Guardians of Traffic torn down to add lanes on the bridge. Obviously he did not get his way. How often do you make note of  these 43-foot tall pylons when you use the bridge? And how different would your experience be without them?

Hope Memorial Bridge Texture

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